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foreign policy. >> okay. >> what about his policy, policy. >> would you agree though that other than his domestic and foreign policies he is not doing a bad job? >> no, i think there is is a narrow middle ground that is not covered by the domestic or the foreign, the inner galactic policies. >> he won't build a death star. >> he is less like ambudsing points. just an outside observer. >> he has done great work with middle earth. >> he is a free marketer. hands-off the middle earth. >> jedediah, i am with you. i thought the ad was bad. they could have made their point without using the first family. as you pointed out, in a subsequent ad they did. >> i just think really -- they would have looked like the bigger people to come back and say you know what, barack obama, you want to use kids to make your point that's fine. play the higher ground. if you have the facts on your side, you don't need to go there. >> personally i think the nra has gone off the rails. i got tired of reading unhinged e-mails from them. >> they felt the same way about you. >> my e-mails to them were not out of hand.
relationships on behalf of the presidents and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world. but let me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and continuing to work with you for the issues that you champion over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of biological weapons, fighting for human rights against hiv/a.i.d.s. around the world. if your new role, should you be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel and through cooperation where possible and isolation where necessary as in the case of iran. of course, it goes without saying that you have truly been a world leader in one of the most consequential issues of our time, climate change. it heartens me to know that you will be our voice to the world. whatever challenges
the latest details and take a look at the latest front in the growing list of u.s. foreign policy challenges when nbc news foreign correspondent amman joins us on set coming up next. [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? maybe you want to incorporate a business. or protect your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like the help of an attorney. at legalzoom a legal plan attorney is available in most states with every personalized document to answer questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. >>> the white house is currently monitoring a kidnapping situation. approximately 44 nationals, including an unconfirmed number of americans, were kidnapped wednesday by an al qaeda linked group in retaliation for french air strikes against rebel forces in neighboring mali. speaking from the white house podium this hour white house press secretary jay carney, confirmed that u.s. citizens are involved and said president obama was being briefed regularly on the ongoing situation. he would not address media reports that a rescue attempt by the algerian
foreign policy posts, we can be sure that vietnam will continue to lurk in the foreign policy apparatus. you'd think we couldn't learn more of what happened in vietnam given the books and movies telling the tales but you would be wrong. one day, one graduate student researching post traumatic stress disorder searched through secret pentagon archives and interviewing vets and reading journals to uncover the story of american atrocities in vietnam. in a war where we killed more than 2 million civilians. the result is a book called "kill anything that moves" where he says the stunning scale of civilian suffering far beyond the result of bad apples but the policy. serious accusations of nick turs joining us now. i want to warn the viewers some of the images in this segment might be disturbing. but nick, the most important question, what is the value to america in unearthing this now and talking to americans about the things, the atrocities that happened in vietnam at american hands? >> well, thanks for having me on. i think it's incumbent on americans to know exactly what war is about, espe
detachment has been his foreign policy hallm k hallmark. they are a catalyst present but not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that factor into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if you look -- broaden out a little bit, then you have syria, which is in state collapse, and is probably going to be in some sort of state of anarchy over the next few months. that will
agenda now. and in foreign policy, very often, the actions you have taken, the consequences are now clear whether good or bad. and you either have to make a corrective course for some of the bad consequences or try to solidify some of the gains that you've made. and because you really don't have four years now. it will start to slip away very quickly. you've got to set some priorities, because the president's time, the secretary of state's time, secretary of defense's time is pretty limited. you better know what you want to achieve in in in three years or so >> you told me earlier this morning something i had never known. upper the national security adviser, one of the president's closest aides during the first term. then you were nominated to be secretary of state, and you told me you had to go through a full background check. >> that's right. i remember thinking-- they were going out and talking to my neighbors again. and i remember thinking didn't we just do this four years ago? you know what i've been doing for the last four years. maybe it's a little bit of a sense of the turf wars i
on the notion he was going to transform the way the u.s. conducted its foreign policy around the world. he then proceeded to double down on some of the greatest successes of the bush administration. if you look at the use of the state secrets privilege or the with the obama administration expanded the drone wars, powered special operations forces from jsoc to join special operations command to operate in countries where the united states is not at war, if you look at the way the obama administration essentially boxed congress out of any effective oversight role of the covert aspect of u.s. foreign policy, what we really have is a president who has normalized for many, net -- many liberals, the policies they once opposed under the bush and ministration. this has been a war presidency. yesterday as president obama talked about how we don't need a state of perpetual war, multiple u.s. drone strikes in yemen, a country we are not at war with, where the u.s. has killed a tremendous number of civilians. to make, most disturbing about this is john brennan, who really was the architect of this dro
japanese foreign policy towards the asean region. >> i don't think japan ever saw asean as a great priority. in fact, in japan's world view, you know, america is number one and europe is number two. and asean was way low in the priorities, you know. and i think the key thing for japanese policymakers to understand today is that today europe represents the past. america represents the present. and asia, including southeast asia, represents the future. this is now the future of the world. >> reporter: southeast nations are gaining confidence thanks to their rising economic power. leaders from china frequently visits member nations of asean. three years ago, china and asean abolished most bilateral free trade agreements and tariffs. the deal created the world's largest free trade zone where the combined population of 1.9 billion people. mahbubani says the trade agreement represented a diplomatic defeat for japan. >> it's interesting that the first country to propose a free trade agreement with asean was not japan. it should have been japan. japan should be one step ahead of china in its dealin
obligations under control and set us on a new fiscal course. >> the president's first foreign-policy priority last term was israeli-palestinian peace. it's unlikely to take the top spot the second time, where most expect the president's focus to be on iran. >> it's hard to believe if we can't get a meaningful negotiation within the next two years that you will not have it read capable of producing a nuclear weapons. then, the u.s. has the choice in its negotiations -- will the solution be containment or is it going to be a preventive strike? >> as he takes the oath again, he will do it with the experience of that presidencies are often formed by crises that happened outside of their control. he will know all folksy brought here last i did not change washington. he will try something -- you have to try something new if you want to accomplish his ambitious agenda this type. >> there are reports that algeria special forces have captured five of the kidnappers involved in the past plant incident. they are looking at the side recovering bodies. >> half how many of the hostages seen in the -- how m
to say, i am going to for bridget to focus on foreign policy rather than domestic policy. all of that has to come with regards to the dialogue that goes on between any president and the people who put him in office. tavis: this inauguration is special because the president has been inaugurated for a second time on this historic king holiday. this is also the first time any president has been inaugurated while, the steps near where he is inaugurated, is a monument to dr. martin luther king jr. you were with the president when the monument was unveiled. offer some reflections on what that experience was like. >> obviously, that was a tremendous experience last year. that monument, i spent some much of my life, the last 10 years, helping to design it. i tell the whole story about how we wanted to be a monument not just to king, but to the tremendous freedom struggle. to be there and watch president obama, i was interested in what he would have to say. no one would question that obama, from a very early age, through his mother, understood king's importance and the importance of the movement.
the turmoil in north africa overall affected u.s. foreign policy? we get some answers. >> brown: then, two military stories. we get the latest on defense secretary leon panetta's decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat. >> ifill: and we explore the pros and cons of drone warfare and examine the technology behind it-- the subject of tonight's edition of "nova."
controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy, but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie, more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry, assuming what most people believe the obvious confirmation because he's of the senate himself, will he be a different secretary of state? >> would expect, charlie, that you'll see a little bit more of the back-channel negotiating style that we associate with a kissinger or jim bake frer senator kerry. he thinks that we need a period of quiet can diplomacy to explore options, to see if there's some way to negotiate some kind of deal over the nuclear issue with iran, to explore some way with russia to get a negotiated political transition in syria. and i think h
's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to tell you that massachusetts is a great teacher of diplomatic skills. whether it was negotiating his way to
the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting disease are also priorities. he's expected to easily win approval for the job from the senate. to syria where authorities have called for a million-man prayer at mosques on friday in an effort to stem anti-regime demonstrations. >> the embattled president was also shown on state television praying with syria's spiritual leader to mark the birthday of the prophet mohammad. the fighting around damascus and other cities continues. a french woman who faced 60 years in a mexican jail on kidnapping charges is back in france. >> the 38-year-old was welcomed in paris by relatives and supporters. a mexican supreme cou
to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two former national security advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."
. he's not going to ttckle foreign policy.((ot mcdonough)4 44he talled about hope and change, and people &phad belief in what he would do, but now we have a record. he talked the talk, but doesn't walk the walk.aad ow the nation watches to sse if the president whooinnpiied so puch hope fourryears ago.... phaage.... .... in his econd reporting.) hhw are the roads looking tonnght? 3 toonght?carrie peirce has our trafficcedge report. reeort.mappdot- 883shawanmdot- 695 llbertymdot- 95 n of 195map- the hostage situution mmy be over, but, there are stilll many questions ssrrounding the algerian stand-off... 3 thrown on the ttacks.what pooice say may have caused a man tt put aawoman's life in serious anger. and pleaddng for an organ donor.the rrason one man has taken to the streets. 3 --adblib weaahhr the car on the left was filled up with low detergent gasoline. the car on the right was filled up with bp gasoline with invigorate. which helps clean and protect its engine so it can get a few more miles per tank than the car on the left. go a little farther with bp gasoline with i
attack. joining us now, danielle pletka, vice president foreign policy and defense studies, defense policy studies, i should say, at the american enterprise institute. danielle, thanks for being with us. you wrote a column this week in which your first words were it's hard to like john kerry? [laughter] >> well, i worked for ten years up at the senate foreign relations committee when senator kerry wasn't the chairman, he was one of the other members of the committee. he's just not that popular on capitol hill. he hasn't worked well with other members. that was one of the problems he had when he ran for president. he's perceived as being stand offish, as being uninterested in their issues and in being kind of doctrinaire on policy. jon: but bob corker, the new mexico senator -- we're going to be talking to him next hour -- had glowing words for senator kerry in the hearing this morning. >> every senator walks into a hearing with another senator who's been nominated for something thinking there but for the grace of god go i. it's a collegial institution, but the collegiality is about
of fundamental issues for a president, guns and keeping the government going and fighting for his foreign policy team. it's not like he's looked for a fight. let's face it, newtown forced everybody to deal with this. >> newtown has changed everything. >> i don't think he's looking for a fight. i think he's found one. >> i agree with you. i think since the election this has been the best period the president has had in the last four years. a lot of things have come together for him. he's in sync with the country, and the country is in sync for him. the question for the gop, are you prepared for this barack obama? you didn't seem to be able to handle the first one. are you prepared for this one who now has the kind of wind in his sails going into a second term that can be very, very good for him in terms of at least in the first six or so months laying down some hard lines for the gop to cross. i think they can, but they're going to have to make the argument, you know, from a principled position, get off the crazy noise we have -- >> don't they have -- >> distract -- >> on an issue we just talked
of jockbs and what's happening in north africa and foreign policy, at least not yet. where should they make a move? >> if the president is true to his word, he needs to do something about the economy, about job creation. there are more unemployed or underemployed people in this country today than there were when the president first took office. we've seen a 33% increase in spending on welfare programs. the african-american unemployment rate in this country is double the national average. and nothing that the president is talking about right now seems to be geared toward putting those people back to work. >> i want to put some numbers on the screen right now, it's fox news polling that's new and how the people feel about the president now compared with four years ago. 47% disapprove, compared with 16% four years ago and look at the flip-flop in terms of those who approve there on the screen, and 47-65%, the jobs that you're talking about, maybe point a little to that, but there are other things that you've written about in a column. >> absolutely. look, you have a middle class whose incomes
law. he has been co opted but part of that was because the foreign policy was complicity. they welcomed the muslim brotherhood and the white house doing that. we haven't been serious about getting behind executive forces. we were serious about getting behind anti communist parties in the cold war in europe. recreating that would be a much better way to go in my opinion. >> as you look at that part of the world it is volatile. we know terrorists are there. we know right next door the french are fighting in mali to drive out terrorists there. they have already asked for our help. we have a situation in turkey where we put patriot missiles on the ground to help them out they have a civil war next door playing out inside syria. going forward, i mean it sounds like this needs to be a part of the world where we engage but how do we engage without putting our people in harm's way? >> we should be smart about doing it. we have a relatively new u.s. africa command. that's the over riding story of the past couple of months. the nexus of the islamists insurgency in many ways was cen
and their second terms end up focusing on foreign policy, maybe more than they intend to, maybe more than their first terms. why is that? >> the main reason probably is when a president comes in for a second term, he usually has about six to eight months to get things through congress. it may seem small, but even lbj in '65, with 61% presidential landslide, more democrats 234 congress than any other time in the 20th scentry except for roosevelt, he knew enough about the senate and the house, he said i've got six months because i'm going to be asking democrats and some republicans to cast some risky votes. after a while, they're going to start rebelling because they're going to look to the election ne next year. foreign policy is something you can do without running to congress for permission ever day. >> ah. it's the can when you can't do other things. >> indeed. >> they're always from history. in terms of the president looking ahead at six to eight months, what they're telegraphing right now from the white house is that the heavy lift they're going to ask for is a variety of measures rel
't be any more. kicked off the state's last night after bashing the president's foreign policy. here is just a bit of what happened. ♪ lou: i thought that was a rather -- went on for more than 30 minutes. thirty minutes. what he said or how long he took to say it. lupe fiasco has made headlines before. not two years ago he called the present the biggest terrorist. is sort of makes you wonder why he was invited to begin with. i thought it was kind of a catchy tune. up next in a gas prices and the national debt of nearly doubled. more than 20 million people remain out of work. what story? the "a-team" rejoins us or, if you will, an analysis of this administration first and second term prospects. monica crowley, michael goodwin, judith miller are back. stay with us. ♪ lou: well, i hate to break up the inaugural party with the fact that we realized that a number of americans have died along with a nuber of others in that hostage siege in algeria. we are back. monica crowley is here, as is judith miller and michael goodwin. i want to start with you. this is another raw, open wound on this adm
taxpayer? we'll explain in a dangerous foreign policy, next. [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. >> now, in an effort to unite the country, but in the end president barack obama's inaugural address was a campaign style stump speech and years from now not only remembered for his divisive combative tone, but exposed the
foreign policy and hopefully tomorrow in john kerrey's hearing before the senate foreign relations committee we'll get into that because the real issue is the date on obama foreign policies. >> thank you. phil mickelson, tiger woods, lebron jamgs and derek jeter, guess, what they're all supply siders. i'm going to try to explain that to you up next. (announcer) scottrade knows our clients trade and invest their own way. with scottrade's smart text, i can quickly understand my charts, and spend more time trading. their quick trade bar lets my account follow me online so i can react in real-time. plus, my local scottrade office is there to help. because they know i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. voted "best investment services company." ♪ i don't wanna be right [ record scratch ] what?! it's not bad for you. it just tastes that way. [ female announcer ] honey nut cheerios cereal -- heart-healthy, whole grain oats. you can't go wrong loving it. excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i thi
seconds i want to close it out with you. it seems at times the president left foreign policy to secretary of state hillary clinton. george, do you see him play an extended role in foreign policy or will he late john kerry take the lead. >> i think he will. his speech focused on making sure friends of old enemies. he's focusing on democrac diplomacy. that's something that obama will have to get involved with at that level. i think he will get involved. >> john: one more time, alex, does john kerry have a charisma deficit that the president needs to worry about. >> john kerry has never been known for charisma, but he has been on the stage for a long time and he can hold his own. >> that's why the two of you are always the smartest kids in class. thank you so much for coming on, on this inauguration day. >> thank you. >> john: what would martin luther king jr. be doing if he were alive today? chances are he wouldn't be working for the koch brothers. coming up next. only on current tv. [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just becaus
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
to be another case where the term becomes almost defined by what's happening abrd by foreign policy? >> i don't think so. i think that -- i mean, the big thing is the deficit and that is something that he needs to tackle. and if he can get a balanced agreement where you have, you know, on a sustainable basis, not just in this short-term, but in the medium and long-term within reduction in expenditure and some increases in taxes, i think that would be good. on the other hand, you have the gun control question which is another big domestic issue which is going to to drain a lot of his political capital, but which he's decided to get stuck into and i don't think there's any retreat from that now. >> final question, do you expect there to be a grand bargain, yes or no, this year or during his second term when it comes to deficit and debt reduction? >> i do expect it in his second term, yes. >> pippa? >> i don't. >> okay. more skepticism about it, but we like your optimism. maybe they will be inspired to come to some sort of agreement. stay there, both of you. next, we'll bring you the latest on a
and construct this bipartisan foreign policy that's been the tradition in this country and helped us win the cold war. >> senator barbara boxer. we were all so young. only so few years ago. senator, thanks very much for joining us. >>ates flashback. interestingly, have you now spoken with senator hagel, former senator hagel, and you have decided that you will support him. tell me what did he say that persuaded you that this was not just a convergence of -- conversion of convenience? that he is really committed to your value system going forward. >> not just did i speak with him at length, but i asked him to put in writing his positions on the various issues of concern to me, which included the issue of sanctions against iran, our relationship with our great ally israel, which included his attitude toward gays in the military, which included his attitude towards making sure that women in the military are protected from rape m military and, many of the, have the same reproductive health care as women outside the military. this wasn't one question. it was a series of questions. i will say a
. >> reporter: a number of presidents in their second terms have focused heavily on foreign policy and now that mr. obama has begun the job of replacing his outgoing secretaries of state and defense and the director of the cia, he'll have new faces to work with on his foreign policy team. joe johns, cnn, washington. >>> well, most people who come to washington for president obama's second inauguration are happy just to be able to witness history. >>> but some visitors want a little bit more, like monogrammed pillow cases and a 24-hour butler. who wouldn't want that? you can get it all for a price. we'll tell you about it when we come back. d. earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ both ] 2% back on groceries. [ all ] 3% on gas. no hoops to jump through. i earn more cash back on the things i buy the most. [ woman ] it's as easy as... one! -two. -[ all ] three! [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell
on foreign policy and and domestic issues. the obama doctrine calls for ending america's wars, avoiding future ones and nationbuilding here at home. good ideas all. but, mishandled, they could signal a retreat from washington's global leadership. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations the united states had, compare that with today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington's generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed
or foreign policy, the challenge is to overcome those obstacles that the political culture place in front of them. host: a call from cincinnati, ohio. caller: in a country where originally white people were not even citizens of this country and now we have a black president, i think we've come a long way. i feel that president obama has not done enough for either side. i think in the beginning it was an issue for him. now he's just like, i am going to be the president. but there are still people who cannot get past that. how does that affect his second term? i have to say, particularly republicans -- how do we get people over the issue of his race? guest: the sad reality is, there are some people that -- i do not think we want to make the mistake of exaggerating their numbers -- there are some people for whom they will never get over the issue of race. there are other people who quite sincerely, for reasons having nothing to do with race, believe that the president's agenda, in their estimation, is too fill-in-the-blank. the larger issue is how we create a political process in which any p
'll explore that dangerous foreign policy next. and a choice. take advil, and maybe have to take up to four in a day. or take aleve, which can relieve pain all day with just two pills. good eye. yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? [ voice of dennis ] silence. ♪ while everyone else seems headed in the wrong direction ford is not just going forward, it's going further. introducing the entirely new ford fusion. with a hybrid that's the most fuel-efficient midsize sedan in america. it's an entirely new idea of what a car can be. [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >> now, in an effort to unite the country, but in the end president barack obama's inaugural address was a campaign style stump speech and
've been an outstanding secretary of state, an exemplary representative of american foreign policy and american values and interest to every leader around the world. you have changed the face of america abroad and extended the hospitable reach of our nation to ordinary citizens, in addition to world leaders. during your tenure, you have steered us through economic crisis in europe, changing relations with asia, regime change in the arab world, a momentous transition in libya, and a trend towards global strength based on economics rather than arms. in addition to these priorities, on nearly every trip of which you are the most traveled secretary in history, you also supported, met, and provided a voice to those individuals that don't live in the limelight. women, children, the lbgt community, made a real personal difference in the live of so many people, and for that you have the thanks of a grateful nation. i know you will not go gently from the world stage and i look forward to working closely to you in the future. we thank you for your service here in the senate and as secretary
.s. foreign policy? we get some answers. >> brown: then, two military stories. we get the latest on defense secretary leon panetta's decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat. >> ifill: and we explore the pros and cons of drone warfare and examine the technology behind it-- the subject of tonight's edition of "nova." >> our mind tries to put it in rms of robot or human? but the reality is a mix. >> brown: we close with politics and a look at the way forward for the republican party, beginning with today's house vote to extend the nation's debt limit for three months. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: secretary of state hillary clinton testified for the first time today about last september's deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. her testimony befor
choice to carry forward the obama administration's foreign policy, and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> and at her side one of her toughest critics on benghazi. today recounting how he and fellow vietnam veteran john kerry worked together to normalize relations with vietnam in the 1990s. >> helping to establish a relationship with vietnam that serves american interests and values rather than one that remained meyered many mutual resentment and bitterness is one of my proudest accomplishments as a senator. i expect it is one of john's as well. witnessing almost daily his exetch lear statesmanship is one of the highest privileges i've had here. >> kerry's first appearance on the senate foreign relations panel as an activist. some things don't change. >> how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in vietnam? >> i'm tired of -- >> when i first came to washington and testified, i was testifying as part of the group of people who came here to have their voices heard, and that is, above all, what this place is about, so i respect, i think, the woman who was voicing her concerns about t
foreign policy agenda. >> what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're considering you as a possibility for secretary of state? >> she didn't believe it. >> fell leap is one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day, after hearing it from two reporters and i'm pretty sure her rely was something along the lines of not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant why not just say no? >> i think she did, or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton, secretary of state designate. >> clinton was quickly confirmed but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been surprised. >> surprised that while secretary clinton and president obama have been separated often as she
too difficult, and they become foreign policy presidents in part because they have so much more leeway. but for barack obama, i think this happened early. >> today, we got the obama plan for leaving iraq... >> president obama announced the current phase of the war is coming to an end... >> narrator: early on, obama had set a timetable for withdrawing troops from iraq. >> within 19 months... >> he came into office promising to get out of iraq. his rise had a lot to do with his opposition to the iraq war. and i don't think he ever looked back. >> narrator: but there was another, secret side to obama's approach to the world. candidate obama had been critical of much of the bush administration's top secret war on terror. as president, it was a different story. >> his people made it clear that in the terrorism arena, he was going to be as tough if not tougher than the bush people. he was going to be extraordinarily aggressive. he and his people reviewed all existing ongoing cia covert operations and with the exception of aggressive interrogations, endorsed all of them, and doubled down on a
the obama administration's foreign policy. and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> if you confirm me, i would take office as secretary, proud that the senate is in my blood. but equally proud that so too is the foreign >> reporter: john mccain and kerry forged close bonds over vietnam. both naval officers, mccain was imprisoned. kerry returned to testify 1. his first appearance before this committee. >> how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in vietnam? >> reporter: decades later, they united as senators to resolve p.o.w. issues and normalize relations with vietnam. >> working toward that end with john and witnessing almost daily his exemplary statesmanship is one of the highest privileges i've had here. >> reporter: today, they do have differences. mccain is more willing to arm the rebels in syria. >> i think we ought to tell the syrian people that we're either going to help them or we're not. >> if you have a complete implosion of the state, nobody has clearer definition of how you put those pieces back together. >> reporter: he and others also pressed kerry on benghazi. >> are you
the latest and one of the clearest examples of this direct connection between our foreign policy and immigration. in the census of 1980, there were less than 100,000 salvadorans listed. just 32 years later, we're poised to become the third largest latino population in the united states. you have to remember el salvador is the smallest country in all of the americas. and yet how is it inly 32 years, we are about to become the third largest in population in the u.s.? if all the rhetoric about immigration was true, and it's this poverty or a dysfunctional government, if that were really the cause of immigration, you would have had people coming from el salvador forever. but that's not the case. people started coming in 1980 because of the war, and specifically because of our own country's actions in the war. in the film, we talk about the school of the americas and how most of the human rights abuses and the massacres, including the killing of the nuns and the murder of archbishop romero, was really done by people trained at the school of the americas by our own country. this is a c
will say about foreign policy. we are at a point this and i am worried personally about the next four years but i am curious how much, both that he ended the war in iraq and the war is receding or does he say american is signals something other than thorough retreat from the world which is how it looks. >>bret: we have the address tomorrow, but the state of the union in a couple of weeks away, what is the biggest challenge? >> we are in a real threat to our security at home and overseas but we are in a fiscal crisis. we are at odds, we have a president and a republican party not speaking to each other, we are headed, again, to the edge of the default. we have to come up with a solution to that. americans are weary of the aspirational calls for unity they hear from president at state of the union addresses and inaugural addresses but everyone is paying holiday bills worried their taxes could go up. they know that congress is broken. they know the congress is paralyzed. they know president obama was complicity in that. the republicans made a plan do go after him, but he is complicity that the
the senate and house foreign policy panels. if they will cover the september raid, an independent panel's review that harshly criticized the state department, and what the obama administration is going to beef up security at u.s. facilities worldwide. >> congressional republicans have accused the obama administration of ignoring signs of deteriorating security and libya. >> developing news this morning, fire fighters are still on the scene of a fire in a vacant chicago warehouse. this is new video into kron 4. you concede that the flames rising from the top of the building as plums of smoke rose into the sky. on the left you can also see just how cold is there. the fire department says about a third of the city's fire vehicles were battling the fire. no injuries are reported. it's >> this morning a man is in custody after he was seen is shining a laser in a television news helicopter. it the same chopper that you see here in the morning on kron4. this is video from our helicopter partnership with abc 7 news, which was on assignment over oakland monday night. with their camera recording,
house. they were very controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry assuming what most people believe the obvious confirmation because he's of the senate himself, will he be a different secretary of state? >> would expect charlie that you'll see a little bit more of the back-channel negotiating style that we associate with a kissinger or jim bake frer senator kerry. he thinks that we need a period of quiet can diplomacy to explore options, to see if there's some way to negotiate some kind of deal over the nuclear issue with iran, to explore some way with russia to get a negotiated political transition in
? >> government, should provide for defense, and foreign policy that is noninterventionist and stays out of the affairs of the rest of the world. neil: you are like a libertarian. >> in that regard i am, look at last 40 years it has ban a fiasco, vietnam, you have to be kidding me. and it needs to be shrunk, and social chunks, supported -- social insurance, is which are vidother side of the spending problem. if we don't get at military industry complex, and social insurance we're kidding ourselves, the deficits will grow. neil: then what. i don't see anything being done. >> i think that is why i say the budget is a doomsday machine, we face a permanent fiscal cliff of 8% gdp gap. i see a constant political battle, every year there will be a deb debt ceiling crisis. neil: what do you think of the president? >> you know you can't have a dictate adictatorship, you havea bad blow up in financial markets. neil: is that coming? >> i do think so, a blame bernanke more than anybody else for the mess, when he said you can borrow money for 3 years to pay federal deficit at 30 basis points that is
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
should be our foreign policy, keeping gadhafi empower, is that four or in opposition to american interests? i don't get them as issues' notebook. those are policy issues. i'm mainly concerned with regime issues. but you take your point, i am making a distinction between the democratic sovereignty and so i guess they don't have an objection to the overthrow of the burmese government. it would have an objection is a policy, i don't think to be a good policy to change every country in the world i am not advocating not in any sense. we can argue about different policies. i'm saying is a form of government, the liberal democratic nationstate is superior to other forms of government. one would be global governance. others isn't autocratic regime. i talk about russia and china has autocratic regimes than i do see any problem pushiness countries in a democratic direction, not by force, the public affairs and so on would be an acceptable policy. we could do it or not do it is a policy decision. of course there is radical islam, which establishes sharia as the constitutional structure and
into the north africa region years ago. i'm afraid our foreign policy has not kept up. >> heather: and that's what i want to ask you about, the foreign policy. for months, u.s. officials, we have intensively lobbied algeria, whose military is by far the strongest in north africa, i think you would agree. we've lobbied them to intervene in next door mali where the rebels have established this well defended base of operations. why, in your opinion, have they not acted and why did they shun outside help in dealing with this latest hostage crisis? >> because they don't view it in their personal interest. the algerian government and military, they are very efficient. the military is very efficient. they're not subtle, as we've seen from the attack on the facility. we shouldn't be surprised at their aggressive reaction to this. they've been fighting extremist concerns for decade. but i think what it points out is again, we don't have much leverage there. you're right, we have been lobbying algeria hard to take a lead role in trying to recapture northern mali, but they don't view it that way. they
's more into foreign policy. >> eleanor, i'm curious how much you think approval ratings matter in a second term. you are not running for office again, but let's face it, popularity will also potentially equate with political capital. >> well, that's right. popularity equates with how much you can get done on capitol hill. i heard you say that bill clinton was one of two president who is rose in popularity second term nap's despite he was impeached. >> small detail. >> he was able to cash in on that because he pitted the american people against the congress. that's the opening this president has. i'm heartened by the fact they'll take organizing for america and make it organizing advocacy. i don't know why they didn't do that in the first term. i'm pretty optimistic about what he can get done. we've seen transformation in american society with the acceptance of gay marriage, transformation in the media. there could be transformations on capitol hill. if the president isn't able to accomplish, for example, his gun control agenda, who's going to look bad on that? that could have r
once, he barely mentions economic growth or the private sector. think about foreign policy. he doesn't mention terrorism, jihaddism. a decade of war is ending. has anyone told the jihadists in algeria or the taliban in afghanistan? he didn't mention afghanistan, he didn't mention iran. how many times in his first term did president obama try to establish his bona fides as a tough guy by saying he would not let iran get nuclear weapons? not a word about it and, indeed, almost the opposite, that engage empty's the way -- engagement's the way to handle problem abroad. jon: we are heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends. >> it really struck me. two things about it. first of all, we would not have won the peace of after world war ii if we hadn't win the wore. he got out of iraq, he's getting us out of afghanistan or, he seems not to want to confront jihadists or the iranian regime, so the idea you can win a peace without winning the war is delusional. but also that sentence, in particular he says they didn't just win the wa
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
was in many ways provided the intellectual framework particularly for a lot of bush foreign policy. vice president biden used the senate and the relationships there and his practical skills has been invaluable in terms of promoting the agenda. >> now we have the marine band about to introduce the vice president of the united states. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the vice president of the united states, joseph r. biden, accompanied by inaugural coordinator for the joint congressional committee on ceremonies, kelly fado. senate department sergeant at arms, martina bradford. house saght at arms carry handley. harry reed and nancy pelosi. >> i said that was the marine band. it was the u.s. army herald trumpets. >> have to get that right. >> what were you saying mark? joe, joe, joe? >> i think this concerns what we were talking about. >> our first glimpse of the president as he walks through the hall, accompanied as you can see behind by chuck schumer head of the joint committee and next to him, lamar alexander of the bipartisanship on display and behind him the leadership of the house
first four years, the person who probably had the most influence on my foreign policy was woman. the people who were in charge of moving forward my most important domestic initiative, health care, were women. the person in charge of our homeland security was woman. my two appointments to the supreme court were women. and 50% of my white house staff were women. so i think people should expect that that record will be built upon during the next four years. >> well, is the criticism fair against the president that's been thrown at him? falling short of his problem of being a champion for women. howard fineman is an msnbc political analyst. and "huffington post" has been facing obama. the road forward. and dee dee meyers. you were kind of a pioneeress in all this. i watch this. and maybe there's tokenism. which is maybe better than nothing. you wonder about the decision how they made it to make it look good. what's better to make it look bad by not doing it or to look good when you don't intend to have that person in there? >> the best is to put people in with the best authority and
on guaranteed income and the same policies in terms of imperial foreign policy is at work. i was glad to see romney did not win. we push back the right-wing takeover. we have a right wing mentality. where is a serious talk about investment, jobs, fighting privatization of education? our battle is just beginning. we have yet to take off the gloves. we have been fighting. >> president obama said to harry belafonte, according to harry, why don't you and cornell west, some slack? and harry belafonte responded, what might makes you think we are not? >> exactly. i want to ask you about bill o'reilly and tavis smiley. i don't know if you're watching fox on election night, but this is what bill o'reilly had to say about the outcomes of the election. >> what is your sense? he looked at these exit polls. >> my sense of the evening is, is that romney loses in ohio, the president is reelected. >> how do think we got to that point questor president obama's approval rating was so low. this is hypothetical. we don't know who is even winning right now, never mind who won. how do think it got this tight. >>
on foreign policy. >> gregg: i call in audio. we are getting breaking news, one american is dead in the algerian hostage standoff. let me get back to kris wallace, i know you have been following this, as well. many americans are deeply concerned about the hostages and sad news. this is i must attribute to the associated press. situation has been fluid but associated press, sources are saying one american is dead in the algerian hostage standoff. this is tough moment for u.s. forces and the obama administration when they are offering assistance to try to rescue some of these americans, but not being given any permission by the algerians, chris? >> that's right. not given permission but not notified in advance that the algerian military was going to launch this raid on the oil field, the gas fields there in this month-man's land. the numbers whether it was 40 hostages, hundred hostages, how many americans, at one point it was two, another point it's been seven. this has been going on for two or three days. i don't think we have a clear picture how many americans were taken hostage
of using it as an extension of their foreign policy. they have generally been fuelling and funding this for many decades. the algearians need to be confronted. if you are going to be taken seriously, you cannot support terrorist groups either inside or outside their borders. >> michael: and the about that they operated almost unilaterally in trying to free the hostages speaks to that they need to be confronted on that. the book is "leading from behind." richard miniter thanks for being here in "the war room." coming up it's the one time americans get to say to the british, see we can do pomp and circumstance just as well as you can. and republican leaders are on a secret retreat. we'll let you in on that secret. and later, the man, the myth, the legend that's right joe biden's exploits are pit to paper. it's a friday night in "the war room," and we're just getting started, so stick around. [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? irene
on policy during the great depression, specifically how the fed could have handled things better. in fact, in 2000, he wrote a paper entitled a crash course for central bankers, which was published in foreign policy. he has a deep and longstanding commitment as well to education. he recently took a timeout to do a town hall meeting for k-12 teachers. so i am particularly pleased to say that, joining us in the audience, is an advanced placement economic class from a high school. we're delighted to have you with us. a word about our format. for the first portion of our time, dr. bernanke will join me here on the stage in a conversation about a number of economic issues. for the rest of the time, he has graciously agreed to take questions from the audience. around 4:30, our staff will be coming through the aisle to get question cards from you. those watching on line and those of you in the audience are welcome to tweet your questions as well. we will select questions, along with two of our graduates students. it is my great pleasure and honor to welcome to the stage chairman ben bernanke. [a
to the conservative view point whether it be on foreign policy and anti-communism, economic conservativism or limited government, constitutionalism or what today is called social conservativism, more likely then it would be called traditional conservativism. the issues were a little different and less clear back then. but there's always been social conservativism. rusher had a very important ally, a man named frank meyer. meyer remains sufficiently respected and known among at least an older generation of conservatives that there is a frank meyer society here in washington which i'm going to be a little, a group of conservative leaders who keep his memory alive. they're going to be meeting on monday night, and i'm going to be speaking to them. meyer has been tribed by rusher as -- described by rusher as the intellectual engine of the conservative movement. he, too, was an ex-communist, as burnham was. but meyer was a conservative activist. a passionate conservative activist. rusher even told me that meyer had once been a militant communist. i, rusher, had been a militant republican. quote: they're no
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